Dawn DeDeaux: Showing Louisiana To Us As We Disappear

Dawn DeDeaux on the road to Isle de Jean Charles, part of her "The End of the Road" event which was postponed in late June.
Dawn DeDeaux on the road to Isle de Jean Charles, part of her “The End of the Road” event which was postponed in late June.

Dawn DeDeaux is a conceptual artist whose work has increasingly turned to the forces of nature that appear to have turned on Louisiana. Her most recent event – “The End of the Road” – focused on the Terrebonne Parish community of Isle de Jean Charles, home of the United States’ first climate refugees.

The event (which was postponed) was part popular education (a trip to the island and a tour of the community), part participatory art (members of the public were going to stand in formation on the only road connecting to the island and spell the word HOME), and part propaganda (a plane with photographers was going to fly over the formation and distribute the photos of the people standing in HOME formation worldwide).

In 2014, Acadiana Center for the Arts in Lafayette hosted a stop for DeDeaux’s traveling exhibition of her Mothership series.

She served on the board of directors for John Barry‘s Restore Louisiana Now nonprofit which was set up to help generate public support for the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority–East decision to sue nearly 100 oil and gas companies for damage they had inflicted on Louisiana’s coastal wetlands through their exploration, drilling and production activities.

She’ll by my guest on Where the Alligators Roam this Sunday, July 10, on KPEL 96.5 FM at 5 p.m. PDST. Catch it on the radio, over the Internet via live stream, or you can download the free mobile app RadioPup from Apple’s App Store or Google Play.

More information coming during the week.

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